Age-Related Eye Problems Are Normal

HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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Tearing. This occurs when your eyes make too many tears, which can happen if you’re sensitive to light, wind or temperature changes.


You can take steps to prevent damage to your eyes. When you’re outdoors in the daytime, always wear sunglasses that shield your eyes from 100 percent of the sun’s harmful ultraviolet rays. This may help reduce your risk of cataracts, pinguecula (a yellowish, slightly raised thickening of the conjunctiva on the white part of the eye) and other eye problems. Be sure to wear safety glasses when working with tools or participating in active sports to help prevent eye injuries that potentially could cause permanent vision loss. People who smoke are at greater risk of developing AMD, cataracts, uveitis (an inflammation of the uvea, the middle layer of the eye) and other eye problems.


Regular eye exams become more important as you reach your senior years. The American Optometric Association recommends annual eye examinations for everyone over age 60 years.


Sources:


Glaucoma. Glaucoma is a group of diseases that can damage the optic nerve. Usually associated with high pressure in the eye, it affects the side or peripheral vision. If you don’t catch glaucoma early, it can lead to permanent vision loss.


Diabetic Eye Disease. Diabetic eye disease is a leading cause of blindness. The most common form is diabetic retinopathy, which occurs when diabetes damages the tiny blood vessels inside the retina.


Low Vision. People with low vision find everyday tasks – reading mail, shopping, cooking, watching TV, writing – difficult to do, even with regular glasses, contact lenses, medicine or surgery.


Dry Eye. Dry eye occurs when the eye does not produce tears properly or tears that are not of the correct consistency and evaporate too quickly. Dry eye can make it hard to perform some activities, such as using a computer or reading for an extended period of time.

AGE-RELATED EYE PROBLEMS ARE NORMAL

HARLEENA SINGH

Harleena Singh is a professional freelance writer with a background in teaching and education. She has a keen interest in food and health related issues and can be approached through her website freelancewriter.co. Checkout her blog and network with her on Google+, Twitter, and Facebook.

more articles by harleena singh

Once you’re in your 40s, your vision starts to change. You may need glasses to see up close; you may have more trouble adjusting to glare or distinguishing some colors. These changes are a normal part of aging. But you are also at higher risk for developing eye diseases and conditions such as age-related macular degeneration, cataracts, diabetic eye disease, glaucoma, low vision and dry eye. Take a look at some of these problems:


Presbyopia. Presbyopia is when you can’t see close objects or small print clearly. You may not notice any changes until around age 40 years. It’s easy to correct with reading glasses and contacts.


Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). AMD is a disease that slowly destroys sharp, central vision, which is needed for seeing objects clearly and for common daily tasks such as reading and driving. Some studies suggest regular exercise, such as walking, can reduce the risk of AMD by up to 70 percent.


Cataract. A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye. Vision with cataract can appear cloudy or blurry, colors may seem faded and you may notice a lot of glare. Cataracts often form slowly without pain, redness or tearing.