HERBS FOR HEALTH MANAGEMENT

Herbs are a foundational root in medicine and health treatments, dating back thousands of years throughout every culture around the world. Modern Western herbalism comes from ancient Egypt. The Greeks developed a comprehensive philosophy of herbal medicine by 100 BCE and the Romans built upon it to create a variety of medical practices, some of which are still used today.

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ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE IMPACTS PSYCHOLOGICAL HARDINESS

Psychological hardiness is an individual’s resistance to stress, anxiety and depression. It includes the ability to withstand grief and accept the loss of loved ones. Alternative medicine is a more popular term for health and wellness therapies that have typically not been part of conventional Western medical approaches but are often used along with conventional medicinal protocols.  Coping and dealing with stress in a positive manner play a major role in maintaining the balance needed for health and well-being.

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ALTERNATIVE REMEDIES FOR ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Interest in complimentary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasing as consumers and health care professionals search for additional ways to treat anxiety, depression and other mental health disorders. Some of these remedies include:

St. John’s Wort.  More than 30 studies show it to be effective for treatment of mild forms of depression,…

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Noise-induced hearing loss is caused by damage to the delicate hair cells in the inner ear that vibrate in response to sound waves. Just as with an electrical circuit, these hair cells can be overloaded with too much noise or with sounds that are too loud. Conductive hearing loss occurs because of a physical condition or disease that prevents sound from being transferred from the outer or middle ear to the inner ear. Conductive hearing loss is usually mild and temporary because in most cases medical treatment can help. Possible causes of conductive hearing loss include wax buildup or fluid in the middle ear due to poor Eustachian tube function (this tube drains fluid from the middle ear and ventilates it to regulate air pressure there). Other causes are ear infections, foreign objects lodged in the ear, a ruptured eardrum, structural malformation of parts of the ear, ear trauma or, in rare cases tumors.


Mixed hearing loss includes elements of both sensorineural and conductive hearing loss. In addition to some irreversible hearing loss caused by a problem with the inner ear, there can also be an issue with the outer or middle ear.


Source:  


3 TYPES OF HEARING LOSS

ANGELA S. HOOVER

Angela is a staff writer for Health & Wellness magazine.

more articles by Angela s. hoover

Possible causes for sensorineural hearing loss include exposure to loud noises; aging; medicines that damage the ear; illnesses such as meningitis, measles and certain autoimmune disorders; genetics; head trauma; and structural malformation of the inner ear. Presbycusis, tinnitus and noise-induced hearing loss are all forms of sensorineural hearing loss.


Presbycusis, the most common form of hearing loss in those age 55 years and older, comes on gradually due to changes in the ear that happen as we age. It typically involves damage to the inner ear. Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and other health conditions common with aging and ototoxic medications can all contribute to presbycusis.


Tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, is the perception of a sound in the ears or head that has no external source. Many people with tinnitus experience a ringing, humming, buzzing or chirping sound. Others even perceive singing or music. Experts believe neural hyperactivity, or overstimulation of the nerves, leads to tinnitus. It may also be the byproduct of noise exposure. Teenagers are increasingly experiencing tinnitus, possibly as a result of frequent noise exposure, according to a study published in Scientific Reports.  

Hearing loss is quite common and can happen at any time in life. One in eight Americans aged 12 years and older has hearing loss in both ears, according to the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. That’s 13 percent of the population, or 30 million Americans.


The ear has three main parts. The outer ear picks up the sound waves that travel down the ear canal. They hit the eardrum and cause it to vibrate. The middle ear is a closed space behind the eardrum that is normally filled with air, but sometimes fluid collects there, too. When sound waves hit the eardrum, the vibrations move three tiny bones, which then move sound into the inner ear. The inner ear, or cochlea, sends the sound to the brain as electrical signals via the auditory nerve. Even the slightest flaw in any part of the pathway can cause hearing loss.


There are three basic types of hearing loss: sensorineural, conductive and mixed. The most common type of hearing loss is permanent and irreversible. It occurs when there is a problem with the sensory hair cells and/or neural structures (nerves) in the inner ear. The auditory nerve is comprised of many nerve fibers that carry signals to the brain that are interpreted as sound. The auditory nerve can also be damaged in this type of hearing loss. Sensorineural hearing loss reduces the intensity of sound and can also distort what is heard.